There is no glory in that. The mourners will indeed be comforted, etc." The good work that we do is the new-life of Christ within us, that is working through us. God does not expect a Christian to have to wait until the future becomes the present to be blessed. It may seem a little anticlimactic after all the discussion in 5:21-32 … Hill feels that reward can be read as simply "good repute," the opposite of the slander in the previous verse. "And not only that," the apostle Paul writes in Romans 5:3-4, "but we also glory in tribulations, knowing that tribulation produces perseverance; and perseverance, character; and character, hope.". He has made prayer and study a significant part of each day, along with occasional fasting to assist in keeping humble. We cannot escape our responsibility to seek them all. During His earthly lifetime, Jesus demonstrated these qualities in His own person, and He expects us to do likewise. 3 And in the morning: To day there will be a storm, for the sky is red and lowering. The Bereans "received the word with all readiness, and searched the Scriptures daily to find out whether these things were so" (Acts 17:10-11). Seeing we cannot have both the world and the Kingdom, it can help us set our resolve to live righteously. Be very glad! The Lord will judge our hearts on judgment day. … Young's It has never been easy, in part because, regardless of where they live, Christians are different. Matthew 5:1-12 Exegesis :1-2 – Setting up the Beatitudes (Beatitude came from the Latin word for blessed which is beatus) (Wiersbe, Mt. Are the promised blessings intended for the future or now? Although this beautiful verse is relevant to us, in the Church age - in its biblical context, this teaching was given to Israel. For you did not receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption by which we cry out, "Abba, Father." It is rectitude, right doing. The righteousness needed to resist these pressures and respond in a godly manner goes far beyond that of a merely moral person. However, in this context, mere feeling is not the point. The world displays its approval for war-makers by giving them ticker-tape parades, putting them into high office, and remembering their achievements by naming streets, cities, parks, and schools after them—yet God blesses peacemakers. He is intimately acquainted with Him and His purpose rather than merely believing academically that He exists. The beatitudes introduce the Sermon on the Mount, a collection of Jesus’ teachings. . “See God”: Not only with the perception of faith, but in the glory of heaven (Heb. They are Christ's specifications of what every disciple ought to be. However, this description does not mention the relationship to God that really brings the persecution. The Beatitudes, Part 8: Blessed Are the Persecuted. The poor in spirit are those who cast themselves on God's grace. Thy will be done in … It’s interesting that John asked an academic question, recorded in Matthew 11:3, and Jesus responded with a legal answer (Matthew 11:4-6). Can we not obtain mercy and be comforted now? It may also put us into the company of many martyrs exalted in God's Word. Suffering for righteousness' sake is an honor leading to glory. Answer: Jesus used the concepts of salt and light a number of different times to refer to the role of His followers in the world. An element of righteousness is still missing. “See God”: Not only with the perception of faith, but in the glory of heaven (Heb. (NASB: Lockman) Greek: chairete kai agalliasthe, hoti o misthos humon polus en tois ouranois; houtos gar ediochan (3PAAI) tous prophetas tous pro humon. It is interesting and noteworthy that God places the Sermon on the Mount near the beginning of the very first book in the New Testament, immediately after Jesus begins to preach the gospel of the Kingdom of God. It is like you ask the question what does Mkemke mean when he said, "Matthew 5:17-19. what did Jesus mean? "If you cry, it will get better" is the meaning of this second Beatitude, says Brittany, age 6. Matthew 5:12 is the twelfth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. Question: "What does it mean that the love of many will grow cold (Matthew 24:12)?" Jesus was the Word made flesh, Who had come to earth. This beatitude is written about those who are truly doing this. Is not the Kingdom of God a present reality that we can, as Paul says in Colossians 1:13, be "translated into" in the here and now? Matthew 5:12. . The Spirit itself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs—joint heirs with Christ, if indeed we suffer with Him, that we may also be glorified together. I.S.V. After three and a half years of preaching, Jesus Himself had only about 120 disciples (), which does not support the idea that "everyone" was trying to enter the Kingdom upon hearing the gospel. Satan not only hates God, but he also hates all who bear His holy image in them by means of His Spirit. Matthew 12:5. his reference to the priests naturally leads on to the second instance taken from their systematic breach of the technical Sabbath law in the discharge of sacerdotal duty.— ἢ οὐκ ἀνέγνωτε, have ye not read? His life-experiences are often painful, yet he would not part with them for the great wealth, acclaim, and ease that the world offers. The reality is that all eight blessings have both a present and future fulfillment. Peter also perceives persecution as a trial to overcome. Matthew 5:12, NLT: "Be happy about it! As Luther well observes: “With those words He concludes the … The other beatitudes show that a Christian can be filled with a joy that he cannot fully express, yet lament over things that the carnal consider as insignificant. Instead, Jesus makes objective judgments about the state of the citizens of God's Kingdom. 12:14; Rev. Blessed are ye when men shall revile you These words are particularly directed to the disciples of Christ, and are designed to inform them, that they should not be exempted from reproach and persecution, and to animate and fortify them against it; and are prophetical of what they, and the first Christians particularly, were to endure for Christ's sake. Invite a student to read Matthew 5:3, footnote a, aloud, and ask the class to look for what the word blessed means. Matthew places the Sermon at the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry, emphasizing that Jesus is the authoritative teacher of God’s people. Above all, persecution for His sake brings us into fellowship with the sufferings of our Savior. Persecution can also keep us from certain sins because it makes us more vividly aware of the impossibility of friendship with the world. They will receive persecution because they are living correctly—not because they have irritated or infuriated others through their sins or because they belong to another political party, religion, or ethnic group. 25:15) and not according to some arbitrary standard. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Matthew_5:12&oldid=987681964, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 8 November 2020, at 16:24. Such people are just reaping what they have sown. Introduction181 Matthew 5:33-37, the passage we are considering, is about oaths and vows. [⇑ See verse text ⇑] Jesus' list of people who are "blessed," which we know as the Beatitudes, continues to grow. Rejoice and be exceeding glad. 22:3-4). Though the world exalts those filled with pride, self-esteem, and assertiveness, God exalts the humble and meek. However, we must be exceedingly careful we do not suffer because of our own misconduct. Our Savior tells us to rejoice in it because it proves the authenticity of our faith, puts us into a noble succession of towering figures of faith who have preceded us, and guarantees us great reward in the Kingdom. Matthew 16:1-12 (DRB throughout) 1 And there came to him the Pharisees and Sadduccees tempting: and they asked him to show them a sign from heaven. Matthew 5:12, NASB: "Rejoice and be glad, for your reward in heaven is great; for in this same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you." Jesus says, "If you were of the world, the world would love its own. It is the tax collector in the temple, beating his breast and saying, God, be merciful to me, a sinner (Luke 18:9-14). At the same time, a truly good person will irritate them. Persecution is a blessing in disguise designed to bring out the best of Christian character. ... Matthew 6:12(NASB) Verse Thoughts. Happy, however, is not the correct translation in this context. emphasizes their certainty and not merely their futurity. The right relationship with God is the foundation of living in harmony with all His creation. A Christian's life should be his best argument that he does not deserve what is happening to him. Many suffer persecution for zealously holding fast to what is clearly a false religion. And in reality, it is a disguised blessing, designed to complete our preparation for God's Kingdom. “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. N.A.S.B. In line with these other paradoxes, this last Beatitude also states a paradox: All we receive for well-doing is to earn the antipathy of our fellow men. Far from it! Compare all. In fact, Peter says that when one suffers persecution, the glory of God rests upon them. Matthew 5:12 is the twelfth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. What does the word blessed mean? 15 Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. The beatitudes introduce the Sermon on the Mount, a collection of Jesus’ teachings. Question: "What does it mean that believers are to be salt and light (Matthew 5:13-16)?" Jesus made some blistering criticism of the hypocritical Pharisees of His day. We hope that we suffer for our sins only rarely, but when we do, we are getting what we deserve. Just as surely as every Christian character should produce all nine segments of the fruit of the Spirit, so Christ's eight Beatitudes describe His ideal for every citizen of God's Kingdom. Invite students to scan Matthew 5:3–11 silently, looking for words that are repeated at the beginning of each verse. Endeavour to understand the meaning of the words, “for my sake.” All intelligent creatures act from some consideration or other-for the “ sake “ of something. Just as surely as all eight of the qualities should be part of each Christian, so each should share in the eight blessings. Matthew 6:13 Or from evil ; some late manuscripts one, / for yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. They liked to flaunt their 'righteous' deeds, and often made a great public performance of their prayers. Happiness is subjective; the same things do not always make everybody happy. How true are His words, "Without Me you can do nothing" (John 15:5). But even in this, all is not lost because it may lead to repentance, change, and growth. Then the Beatitudes appear as the preamble to the best-known sermon ever preached, teaching intended for those who have repented and are being converted. Human nature dislikes and is suspicious of anyone who is different. It is part of the Sermon on the Mount , the first of a series of … John Donne, author of the poem used in the song, "No Man Is an Island," says of the Sermon on the Mount: "All the articles of our religion, all the canons of our church, all the injunctions of our princes, all the homilies of our fathers, all the body of divinity, is in these three chapters, in this one Sermon on the Mount." Jesus' phrase in the beatitude, "for righteousness' sake," calls upon us to examine ourselves honestly before God both before and after we are opposed. Matthew 5:12 is the twelfth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament.It is the tenth verse of the Sermon on the Mount.This verse is generally seen as part of an expansion of the eight Beatitude, others see it as the second half of the ninth Beatitude, a small group feel it is the tenth Beatitude and thus brings to a close a second Decalogue. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving each day. [4] We personally acknowledge our spiritual bankruptcy before God. Some people become victims of their own character flaws and personality disorders. Each beatitude pronounces the person who possesses that quality as "blessed." The simplest grouping is probably the best, however. But we come to learn from life's experiences following conversion that, however hard we try to live peacefully or to make peace through reconciliation, some refuse to live at peace with us. Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you … God's commands thus describe how to live correctly. They teach us how to conduct relationships with Him and fellow man. We must live with and adjust to the fact that persecution is simply the clash between two irreconcilable value systems. The human heart is so deceitful that Jesus remarks in John 16:2, "They will put you out of the synagogues; yes, the time is coming that whoever kills you will think that he offers God service.". Unlike the gifts of the Spirit, which He distributes as He wills to different members of His body to equip them for different kinds of service, the Beatitudes are qualities each Christian needs. They foolishly take comfort in Matthew 5:10-12, claiming persecution when others merely retaliate against their displays of evil speaking, haughtiness, or self-centeredness. In I Peter 4:12-16, Peter, like Jesus, perceives persecution as inevitable and therefore a Christian should expect it. It is the opposite of arrogance. A Christian presents the standard of Jesus Christ to the world. One example is found in Matthew 5:13: “You are the salt of the earth. It may seem strange that Jesus passes so quickly from peacemaking in the previous beatitude to persecution—from the work of reconciliation to the experience of hostility. For instance, while calling it a virtue, worldly people think goodness is a handicap because they fear it will keep them from achieving their goals. In Africa, the Moslem Sudanese are persecuting nominal Christians, while in Europe, the Slavic Eastern Orthodox are persecuting Moslem Kosovars. In spite of all, joy, exultation is possible—nay, inevitable. Before long, their conscience disturbs them, and they react by persecuting the good person. I am so happy that this Scripture does not say pure in deeds. Jesus Christ is the only reason we can truly live peacefully with God. This is a simple, straightforward definition of righteousness. Hill notes that the Essenes called each other prophets, and that Jesus might have here adopted that usage.[4]. Matthew 5:12-16 The Message (MSG) 11-12 “Not only that—count yourselves blessed every time people put you down or throw you out or speak lies about you to discredit me. Such a person's righteousness comes through sanctification. just as it would be a self-corruptible idea to use quotes made or said by others to explain what Mkemke meant. The second half of each beatitude reveals what the blessing is. He declares, not what they feel like, but what God thinks of them. As the eight qualities provide broad overviews of our responsibilities, the eight blessings give us insight into the broad privileges that come to us because we are meeting our responsibilities and God is pleased. Amen. Stained glass, Chapel of the Sacred Heart, Dingle, County Kerry, Ireland. Other Forerunner Commentary entries containing Matthew 5:12: The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment Sign up for the Berean: Daily Verse and Comment, and have Biblical truth delivered to your inbox. ", it is a self-corruptible idea to honestly use what others in the bible to explain what Jesus said. Matthew 5:16. We need to understand this word because, as some have rightly noted, the Greek word used by Matthew, makarios, can also be translated as "happy." Since a disciple is not above His Master, a follower can hardly expect to escape some form of what the Master received. The Lord will judge our hearts on judgment day. Matthew places the Sermon at the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry, emphasizing that Jesus is the authoritative teacher of God’s people. People with these qualities gain His approval. Compromise will certainly ease the pressure, but God intends persecution to test the Christian's trust, loyalty, sincerity, courage, and patience. He will do anything to get us to retaliate as worldly people do, because then we would display Satan's image rather than Jesus Christ's. It is about what it means to be a light of the world and how to be a light to other people. They make us understand that our spiritual infirmities are so great that we cannot stand for a single hour unless Christ upholds us. At the root of the life we are living there is a strong and dominant reason; or, if … Jesus breaks into the public arena proclaiming, “repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near” (Matthew 4:17). Our love for Christ should be so great that we rejoice that it has come upon us on His account. But we come to learn from life's experiences following conversion that, however hard we try to live peacefully or to make peace through reconciliation, some refuse to live at peace with us. Yet because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you" (John 15:19). As R.G.V. It is like you ask the question what does Mkemke mean when he said, "Matthew 5:17-19. what did Jesus mean? This verse is generally seen as part of an expansion of the eight Beatitude, others see it as the second half of the ninth Beatitude, a small group feel it is the tenth Beatitude and thus brings to a close a second Decalogue. A person's devotion to principle can be measured by his willingness to suffer for it. just as it would be a self-corruptible idea to use quotes made or said by others to explain what Mkemke meant. Therefore, since he writes of true Christians and not those merely in name, persecution will be a test. (The Gospel According to St. Matthew, p. 61). Then God becomes a redemptive Father. We should realize we do not earn the reward because we are doing only what we are supposed to do (Luke 17:7-10). Jesus breaks into the public arena proclaiming, “repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near” (Matthew 4:17).